Curry Base Split Recipe 1: Keema Curry (Ground Meat and Peas)

From top left: mango lassi, chana masala, raita, potato and swiss chard curry, keema curry

Bottom Right: Keema Curry

The first of the various curry you can make using the curry base is Keema, which is ground meat and pea curry.  The best part of this recipe is, if there’s some leftover, you can turn this into samosa. Or, I even make omelets with samosa mixture (kind of Spanish omelets with Indian twist), and mixed with rice, you can make dry curry.  See tomorrow’s post for the recipe for these leftover make-over ideas.

For curry base recipe, click here.

Keema Curry Directions:

  1. Brown ground meat in a skillet and season well. I like to start with extra ginger and garlic before adding meat (optional.)  If using full recipe from the previous post, you will want to use about 2/3 lbs ground meat.
  2. Add the curry base, mix well, add some stock (1/2 c – 2/3 c, if using the full recipe) and simmer for about 10 min until the flavor is incorporated. Add frozen peas (about 1 c) and heat through.  Adjust seasoning.
  3. Top with chopped cilantro (strictly optional. I hate it, so we don’t!) Serve with steamed rice, saffron rice or naan.

Enjoy!

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2 thoughts on “Curry Base Split Recipe 1: Keema Curry (Ground Meat and Peas)

  1. Tried the Keema curry last night and it was a hit with us adults. Might take the kids a few more tries. It is definitely going on my list of go-to dinners. I love that the ingredients are all things I normally have on hand (except the ginger). Any ideas how to keep ginger fresh longer? Have you tried freezing it?

    • Hi Brenda,
      Thanks for your comment and question.
      Glad to hear that you guys liked Keema curry. If the spiciness is the issue, you may want to make first make less spicy version, then split and add extra spices for adults. Or maybe add a little bit of cream to make it milder, or marmalade (just like eggplant curry recipe) for a hint of sweetness. Experiment and make your own family recipe. : )

      You can freeze fresh ginger by 1) peeling the skin off and store in a ziploc bag, 2) when you need it, grate frozen ginger with microplane grater. A Microplane is great for grating hard cheese, lemon rind, chocolate, etc. so if you don’t have one, you may want to purchase it. (They have it at upscale kitchen store, BB&B, probably even at Target.) I like the skinnier one with smaller grates (finer results). I personally don’t freeze ginger, because 1) I use it often in Asian dishes, 2) I buy small knob (or break it off) and keep it in the fridge so that I can finish it before it gets bad or dry. At a typical American household, buying a small knob and freezing it is probably a good idea.

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